Travel Theme: Mountains

I live on a piece of land surrounded by water.  An island, but it’s very definition.  The island of Hispaniola has it’s own mountains to be sure.  At least here, they call them mountains.  I suppose they are but to a little Canadian girl who’s spent many spurts of her life torquing around the Canadian Rockies, these outcroppings are tantamount to the Alberta foothills.  However, Pico Duarte, the tallest peak in DR tops out at a little over 3000 feet.  That is as high as some of the Rockies.  One day I’ll get there.  I wonder, will there be snow?  The highest Canadian peak is just under 6000 feet.

There are higher mountains on the island.  Haiti is much more rugged.  These gentle peaks betray well worn time and plate tectonics.

There are higher mountains on the island. Haiti is much more rugged. These gentle peaks betray well worn time and plate tectonics.

The Caribbean plate pushes and pulls and every now and then snaps, resulting in an earthquake.  Not all are as devastating as the one in Haiti a few years ago, and many are in the ocean.  These forces on the earth’s crust form our land mass.  It’s an interesting subject and the Caribbean plate is pretty cool to focus on.  This is what makes mountains.  Sorry, I digress.  The matter at hand … mountains.

I think what I find fascinating about Dominican Republic’s little mountains is the flora.  Not that it is unusual in any way, but when I think of mountains, our giant mountains, I can smell the balsam, fir, pine, and fresh mountain streams of snow melt.  There’s a crispness in the air in Canada’s Rockies, that is missing here.  Yes, DR mountains provide welcome relief from the heat and sweltering cities, but they are not crisp by Canadian standards.  The flora seems like thick bramble or not agriculturally friendly, and there’s not the luscious greenness of the Rockies.  Yet it is agriculturally friendly.  Stuff grows here and grows very well.  I just don’t get it!  It must be because of the geological significance of limestone and lava.  How does and what does grow?  But grow it does off and on the mountains.

Some of the mountains look verdant … ish!  I know I shouldn’t offer comparisons as you truly cannot compare apples to oranges, but there you have it.  I’m a mountain snob.  Nothing beats the Rockies.  Not to this Canadian!  But, I am willing to cut the DR some slack until I see the big mountains 🙂

DR, from the top of the hill, looking out onto the Caribbean Sea, there are no words to express the sense of wonder.

By the sea, by the sea, you and me, by the beautiful sea, oh how happy we'll be ...

By the sea, by the sea, you and me, by the beautiful sea, oh how happy we’ll be …

From elevation, to sea level, no matter what as an island it’s kinda sorta, gotta be considered “mountainous,”  …  don’tcha think?

That’s all folks, there’s a “mountain” of laundry waiting for me!  Catch you on the flip-side!

Thanx to:

http://wheresmybackpack.com/

for offering up the challenge of this assignment.

Listen to the palms…


~Loca Gringa

© Loca Gringa and https://locagringa.wordpress.com

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9 responses to “Travel Theme: Mountains

  1. I’ve been living in Colorado since ’97 and I agree – for fairly obvious reasons – that the mountains are quite different in most respects to those you find in the Carribean (albeit, I have not been to DR, but have done plenty of SCUBA diving in other places). Quite frankly, I will take any Caribbean island, such as St. Maarten that has a mountain(s) vs. A flat rock like Grand Turks, Belize, etc..The SCUBA diving has to be extraordinary if I visit a flat rock. Just my take of course. 🙂

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